203 FINE ART


1335 Gusdorf Rd. Suite i
Taos, NM  87571
[ 575 ]  751 - 1262  -  email: art@203fineart.com
               








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John DePuy

When DePuy first moved to Taos, still under the influence of his teacher, Hans Hoffmann, he painted nonobjectively. Over time, Hoffmann's influence receded, but his advice to paint from nature remained. For DePuy, the influence on art in New Mexico was "mainly the land" and (as with Louis Ribak) the inspiration Pueblo Indians provided in their connection with the land. In DePuy's work, the purely surface qualities of the land are often eclipsed by the land's sheer power. Subtle graduations of color on walls or in the sky or on limitless plains form a shifting, lively backdrop for suns which shimmer and rivers which slide away and mesas which stand dark. DePuy wrote, "this land speaks of another time sense than our Western-European lineal time." The land DePuy began painting by the mid-1950's exists within spatial time, where moments do not proceed to any destination but repeat endlessly in the regular cycle of day, years, millennia, always returning, circular rather than linear.

Quote taken from David Witt's "Taos Moderns" book.


Original work by John DePuy


Selected works in our inventory


Images are not to scale.




"Rosebud Pass, Utah"
oil on canvas- 1982
46" H x 42" W





"Black Mesa"
oil on canvas- 2011
40" H x 50" W





"Slot Canyon, Utah"
oil on canvas- 2007
50" H x 39 1/2" W





"Thunder River Falls"
oil on canvas- 1999
48" H x 34" W





"Navajo Mountain, Utah"
oil on canvas- 2006
34" H x 48" W





"Rio Grande Gorge"
oil on canvas- 2014
 
28" H x 34" W





"Cedar Mesa, Utah"
oil on canvas- 2015
 
30" H x 35" W





"Echo Cliffs"
oil on canvas- 1969
45" H x 43" W





"Slope, Navajo MT"
oil on canvas- 2007
28" H x 26" W





"Monoliths #2"
oil on canvas- 1958
47" H x 47" W





"Canyon Fire"
oil on canvas - 1984
  12" H x 14" W






  "Sea of Cortez"
mixed media drawing on paper - 1990
  22" H x 30" W






  "Sea of Cortez"
mixed media drawing on paper - 1985
  22" H x 30" W







"Calf Creek Figures"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2010
  22" H x 30" W





"Triangle Arch, Utah"
mixed media drawing on paper - 1996
  40" H x 26" W





"Forms - Obsidian"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2012
  26" H x 40" W





"Spring - Canyon Lands"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2009
  22" H x 30" W





"Calf Creek Figures Escalante River"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2009
  26" H x 40" W





"Arch - Canyon Lands N.P."
mixed media drawing on paper - 2007
  26" H x 40" W





"Chama River Wilderness"
mixed media drawing on paper - 1994
  40" H x 26" W





"Formations, Comb Ridge, Utah"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2002
  30" H x 22" W





"Pedernal Butte, NM"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2006
  22" H x 30" W





"Formation, Cedar Mesa"
mixed media drawing on paper - 1978
  30" H x 22" W





"Butte - Calf Creek, Utah"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2009
  22" H x 30" W





"Comb Ridge, Utah"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2010
  22" H x 30" W





"Monument Valley Formations"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2015
  22" H x 30" W





"Basalt Rocks, Rio Grande"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2008
  26" H x 40" W





"Triangle Arch"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2008
  30" H x 22" W





"Arch Canyon Lands NP"
mixed media drawing on paper - 1978
  30" H x 22" W





"Colorado River"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2013
  22" H x 30" W





"Sierra Blanca, Colorado"
mixed media drawing on paper - 2012
  26" H x 40" W


                   
John DePuy

When DePuy first moved to Taos, still under the influence of his teacher, Hans Hoffmann, he painted nonobjectively. Over time, Hoffmann's influence receded, but his advice to paint from nature remained. For DePuy, the influence on art in New Mexico was "mainly the land" and (as with Louis Ribak) the inspiration Pueblo Indians provided in their connection with the land. In DePuy's work, the purely surface qualities of the land are often eclipsed by the land's sheer power. Subtle graduations of color on walls or in the sky or on limitless plains form a shifting, lively backdrop for suns which shimmer and rivers which slide away and mesas which stand dark. DePuy wrote, "this land speaks of another time sense than our Western-European lineal time." The land DePuy began painting by the mid-1950's exists within spatial time, where moments do not proceed to any destination but repeat endlessly in the regular cycle of day, years, millennia, always returning, circular rather than linear.

Quote taken from David Witt's "Taos Moderns" book.