203 FINE ART


1335 Gusdorf Rd. Suite i
Taos, NM  87571
[ 575 ]  751 - 1262  -  email: art@203fineart.com
               






Tom Dixon in studio 2013

Original work by Tom Dixon


Selected works from our current inventory and biography below.


Images are not to scale.




"blackline"
oil on canvas - 2016
  84" H x 60" W





"notes"
oil on masonite - 2015
  48" H x 48" W





"closeup"
oil on canvas - 2015
  60" H x 84" W





"splitlevel"
oil on masonite - 2016
  54" H x 48" W





"whiteout"
oil on masonite - 2015
  54" H x 48" W





"clover"
oil on canvas - 2016
  72" H x 60" W





"Wings"
oil on canvas - 2014
  60" H x 84" W





"skilines"
oil on masonite - 2015
  46" H x 42" W





"five plams"
oil on clayboard - 2015
  20" H x 16" W - SOLD



"arrangement"
oil on masonite - 2016
  30" H x 26" W





"box'd"
oil on masonite
  48" H x 48" W





"coverup II"
oil on masonite
  48" H x 48" W





"cats cradle"
oil on masonite - 2012
  48" H x 48" W





"willow path"
oil on masonite - 2013
  48" H x 48" W











"sheet music"
  mix media on paper
  15" H x 11.5" W





"coverup"
  mix media on paper
  11.5" H x 15" W


                   
Tom Dixon

Tom Dixon was born April 16, 1947 in Butler Pennsylvania, and raised outside Denver.  As a teenager, he recalls being deeply impressed with a Franz Kline painting at the Denver Art Museum.  After the Army and Germany, Dixon returned to the Denver area where he attended commercial art school for a year and did paste-up and illustration for magazines in the late ‘60s.  In 1969 he moved to Chicago, and on the strength of letters of recommendation from several artists, he “lucked out,” as he put it, and attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago for the next two years.

 

“I didn’t know anything,” he comments.  “I was just a kid from the sticks.  The GI Bill covered my rent.  I could draw realist and super-realist stuff.  But I thought, ‘What?  Do I want to become film emulsion?’  I spent most of my time in the museum.  Painting was dead then.  If you were a painter, they’d send you off to the Chicago Academy of Art.  I wanted to make a painting, and that’s what I’ve been trying to do ever since.”

 

Dixon drifted out of Chicago to the Mill Valley, California area where he did a lot of construction and house carpentry.  In 1978 he moved to Taos, immediately turned his full focus to drawing and painting, and began showing hard-edged, non-objective work on paper at Dana Lesnett’s daring DEL Fine Arts on Kit Carson Road.  For the past 20 years, adjacent to a large parking lot, Dixon has lived and worked in a small studio with copious north light and an unobstructed view of Taos Mountain.  Dixon’s work on panels of multi-hued, obsessively worked layers of oil, appear physically attacked on a human scale.  Scraped, splashed, and scratched, each work is a scarred palimpsest of infinite activity and pigmentation.  Assaulted with a steel chisel, 10 inch brush, wide palette knives, or whatever is handy, the panels reveal strata upon strata of history beneath the frenzied graffiti, countered by lyric color combinations, calligraphic markings and, at times, geometric designs drawn in oil stick.

 

Dixon’s most recently started painting on large scale canvas, scale always being what drives his signature mark, “working on canvas forces me to be more painterly,” and even though the end result emanates an air of more sophistication, the paintings are recognizably an eloquently Dixon.


The Harwood Museum of art "Under the Radar" 2008 group exhibition.